E-mail Subscription

Enter your email address:

Delivered by FeedBurner

Syndicate RSS
Welcome

Mission Statement 

The purpose of FLAPS-2-APPROACH is two-fold:  To document the construction of a Boeing 737 flight simulator, and to act as a platform to share aviation-related articles pertaining to the Boeing 737; thereby, providing a source of inspiration and reference to like-minded individuals.

I am not a professional journalist.  Writing for a cross section of readers from differing cultures and languages with varying degrees of technical ability, can at times be challenging. I hope there are not too many spelling and grammatical mistakes.

 

Note:   I have NO affiliation with ANY manufacturer or reseller.  All reviews and content are 'frank and fearless' - I tell it as I see it.  Do not complain if you do not like what you read.

I use the words 'modules & panels' and 'CDU & FMC' interchangeably.  The definition of the acronym 'OEM' is Original Equipment Manufacturer (aka real aicraft part).

 

All funds are used to offset the cost of server and website hosting (Thank You...)

No advertising on this website - EVER!

 

Find more about Weather in Hobart, AU
Click for weather forecast

 

 

 

 

  FEEDBACK:  

If you see any errors or omissions, please contact me to correct the information. 

Journal Archive (Newest First)
« Alternate Use for OEM Rudder Pedal Circuit Breakers | Main | OEM B737 CDU Conversion - Introduction »
Friday
Mar242017

OEM Rudder Pedal Mechanism and Handles

The OEM rudder handle mechanisms have been sitting in storage for considerable time, and I thought it was time to add them to the simulator and replace the very poorly made and ‘cheesy’ reproductions that I was using.

LEFT:  OEM rudder handles and mechanism installed to Captain-side kickstand.  The stick shaker can be seen in the foreground (click to enlarge).

The rudder mechanism is not a small item that you can easily screw to the kickstand.  Each handle attaches to a 8-inch-long box, that houses the various circuitry, cabling and a dozen or so aircraft circuit breakers. 

Connection to the aircraft’s system is via two Canon plugs at the rear of the unit, while movement of the pedals forward or aft is facilitated by a long metal cable that connects to the rear of the handle.

The mechanism is not light-weight and weighs in at just over 1 kilogram.

The rudder handles do nothing other than add to the aesthetics of the simulator.  However, if wanted the various circuit breakers can be connected to an interface card (something I will not be doing).

LEFT:  Rudder handle mechanism (prior to cleaning).  The long metal cable that connects to the rear of the handle (enabling the forward and aft adjustment of the pedals) has been removed.  The white handle hangs loose and needs to be attached to the box using plastic fasteners (empty holes).  The black circular pull on/off circuit breakers can be seen below the white handle  (click to enlarge).

Installation to MIP

There are several methods that can be used to install the mechanism to the Main Instrument Panel (MIP).

If you are using an OEM MIP, then connection of the mechanism to the kick-stand is a matter of using the existing bolts and placement holes.  Fitment to a reproduction MIP is accomplished differently and depends upon how the MIP is constructed. 

I fabricated an aluminium cradle (saddle) that is attached by two nuts and bolts to the lower portion of the kickstand (under the kickstand out of sight).  The rudder mechanism slides into the cradle and a small screw holds the mechanism in the correct place.  A similar assembly could easily be made from wood and painted Boeing grey.

Read about an alternate use of the circuit breakers.

PrintView Printer Friendly Version

EmailEmail Article to Friend