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Mission Statement 

The purpose of FLAPS-2-APPROACH is two-fold:  To document the construction of a Boeing 737 flight simulator, and to act as a platform to share aviation-related articles pertaining to the Boeing 737; thereby, providing a source of inspiration and reference to like-minded individuals.

I am not a professional journalist.  Writing for a cross section of readers from differing cultures and languages with varying degrees of technical ability, can at times be challenging. I hope there are not too many spelling and grammatical mistakes.

 

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I use the words 'modules & panels' and 'CDU & FMC' interchangeably.  The definition of the acronym 'OEM' is Original Equipment Manufacturer (aka real aicraft part).

 

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Journal Archive (Newest First)

Entries in Aircraft Sounds (1)

Friday
Nov172017

Sounds Reworked - Flight Sim Set Volume (FSSV) - Review

Immersion is a perception of being physically present in a non-physical world.  The perception is created by surrounding the user of the simulator in images, sound or other stimuli that provide an engrossing total environment.  When something does not replicate its real world counterpart, the illusion and immersion effect is degraded.

LEFT:  Engine sounds will be at their highest at takeoff.

Engine Sound Output

The sound output generated by a jet aircraft as heard from the flight deck is markedly different when the aircraft is at altitude.  This is because of differences in air density, temperature, the speed of the aircraft, drag, and thrust settings.  The noise emitted from the engines will always be highest at takeoff when full thrust is applied.  At this time, the noise generated from wind blowing over the airframe will be at its lowest.  At some stage, these variables will change and wind noise will dominate over engine noise.

As an aircraft gathers speed and increases altitude, engine sound levels lower and wind levels, caused by drag, increase.  Furthermore, certain sounds are barely audible from the flight deck on the ground let alone in the air; sounds such the movement of flaps and the extension of flight spoilers (speedbrake).

Being a virtual flyer, the sound levels heard and the ratio between wind and engine sound at altitude is subjective, however, a visit to a flight deck on a real jet liner will enlighten you to the fact that that Flight Simulator’s constant-level sound output is far from realistic.

Add On Programs

Two programs which strive to counter this shortcoming (using different variables) are Accu-Feel by A2A Simulations and FS Set Volume (FSSV).  This article will discuss the attributes of FSSV (Sounds Reworked).

Flight Sim Set Volume (FSSV)

FSSV is a very basic program that reads customized variables to alter the volume of sound generated from Flight Simulator.  The program is standalone and can be copied into any folder on your computer, however, does require FSUIPC to connect with Flight Simulator.  Wide FS enables FSSV to be installed on a client computer and run across a network.  

The following variables can be customised:

(i)     Maximum volume
(ii)    Minimum volume
(iii)   Upper mach threshold
(iv)   Lower mach threshold
(v)    Engine volume ratio

Each of the variables will alter to varying degrees the Mach, engine %N1, rounded engine speed and volume percentage.  

For the program to have effect it must be opened either prior to or after the flight simulator session is opened. 

LEFT:  FSSV pop-up screen showing customised variables (default) that can be set and current reads-outs for the simulator session (click to enlarge).

It’s an easy fix to automate the opening of the program to coincide with Flight Simulator opening by including the program .exe in a batch file

A pop-up window, which opens automatically when the program is started, will display the variables selected and the outputs of each variables.  If the window is kept open, the variables can be observed ‘on the fly’ as the simulation session progresses.  Once you are pleased with the effects of the various settings, a save menu allows the settings to be saved to an .ini file.  The pop-up window can then be set to be minimized when you start a flight simulator session.  

How FSSV Works

The program reads the sound output from the computers primary sound device and alters the various sound outputs based upon customized variables.  The program then lowers the master volume at the appropriate time to match the variables selected.  FSSV will only alter the sound output on the computer that the program is installed.  Therefore, if FSSV is installed to the same computer as Flight Simulator (server computer) then the sound for that computer will only be affected.

Possible Issue (depends on set-up)

An issue may develop if FSSV is installed on a client computer and run across a network via Wide FS, then the program will not only affect the sound output from the server computer, but it also will affect the sound output from the client computer.  

A workaround to rectify this is to split the sound that comes from the sever computer with a y-adapter and connect it to the line-in of another computer, or use a third computer (if one is spare).

In my opinion, it’s simpler to install and run the program via a batch file on the server computer that flight simulator is installed.  The program is small and any drop in performance or frame rates is insignificant.

Summary

The program, although basic, is very easy to configure and use - a little trial and error should enable the aircraft sounds to play with a higher degree of realism.  However, the level that you alter the variables to is subjective; it depends on your perception to the level of sound heard on a flight deck – each virtual flyer will his or her own perception to what is correct. 

The program functions with FSX and P3D flawlessly. 

Finally, If you are unhappy with the result, it’s only a matter of removing/deleting the folder you installed the program to, or close the program during your simulator session to return the sound levels to what they previously were.  FS Set Volume can be downloaded at no charge at http://forum.simflight.com/topic/81553-fs-set-volume/.  

Video

The below video is courtesy of the FSSV website.