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Mission Statement 

The purpose of FLAPS-2-APPROACH is two-fold:  To document the construction of a Boeing 737 flight simulator, and to act as a platform to share aviation-related articles pertaining to the Boeing 737; thereby, providing a source of inspiration and reference to like-minded individuals.

I am not a professional journalist.  Writing for a cross section of readers from differing cultures and languages with varying degrees of technical ability, can at times be challenging. I hope there are not too many spelling and grammatical mistakes.


Note:   I have NO affiliation with ANY manufacturer or reseller.  All reviews and content are 'frank and fearless' - I tell it as I see it.  Do not complain if you do not like what you read.

I use the words 'modules & panels' and 'CDU & FMC' interchangeably.  The definition of the acronym 'OEM' is Original Equipment Manufacturer (aka real aicraft part).


All funds are used to offset the cost of server and website hosting (Thank You...)

No advertising on this website - EVER!


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If you see any errors or omissions, please contact me to correct the information. 

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Wind Correction (WIND CORR) Function - CDU

Wind Correction (WIND CORR)

The approach page in the CDU has a field named WIN CORR (Wind Correction Field or WCF).  Using WIND CORR, a flight crew can alter the Vref+ speed (additive) that is used by the autothrottle to take into account headwinds greater than 5 knots. 

LEFT:  OEM CDU showing WIND CORR display in Approach Ref page (click to enlarge).

The default reading is +5 knots.   Any change will alter how the FMC calculates the command speed that the autothrottle uses.  Any change is reflected in the LEGS page. 

It's important to update the WIND CORR field if VNAV is used for the approach or of executing an RNAV Approach, as VNAV uses data from the Flight Management System to fly the approach.   However, if hand flying the aircraft, or executing an ILS Approach, it's often easier to add the Vref additive to the speed window in the MCP.  Indeed, flight crews for the most part, other than when using VNAV, leave the WIND CORR as its default (+5 knots), and change airspeed by using the MCP or by using Speed Intervention (SPD INTV).

WIND CORR Explained

The ability to increase the Vref speed is very handy if a flight crew wishes to increase the safety margin the autothrottle algorithm operates.

Boeing when they designed the autothrottle algorithm programmed a speed additive that the A/T automatically adds to Vref when the A/T is engaged.  The reason for adding this speed is to provide a safety buffer to ensure that the A/T does not command a speed equal to or lower than Vref.   (recall that wind gusts can cause the autothrottle to spool up or down depending upon the gust strength). 

A Vref+ speed higher than +5 can be inputted when gusty or headwind conditions are above what are considered normal.  By increasing the +speed, the  speed commanded by the autothrottle will not degrade to a speed lower than that inputted.


WIND CORR is straightforward to use.   

Navigate to the approach page in the CDU (press INIT REF key to open the Approach Reference page).  Then double press the key adjacent to the required flaps for approach (for example, flaps 30).  Double selecting the key causes the flap/speed setting to be automatically populated to the FLAP/SPD line. 

It’s important to understand that this is the Vref.  This calculation ALREADY has the +5 additive added; this is the speed that the aircraft should be at when crossing the runway threshold.  

LEFT:  Virtual CDU (ProSim-AR) showing the difference in Vref between a +5 and +13 Knot Wind Correction change.  Vref altered from 152 knots to 160 knots (click to enlarge).

If the headwind is greater than 5 knots, then WIND CORR can be used to increase the additive from the default +5 knots to anything up to but not exceeding 20 knots. 

Type the desired additive into the scratch pad of the CDU and up-select to the WIND CORR line.  The revised speed will change the original Vref speed and take the headwind component into account.  If you navigate to the LEGS page in the CDU, you will observe the change. 

Note that the Vref speed displayed on the Primary Flight Display (PFD) does not change.  This remains at Vref +5.

For a full review on how to calculate wind speed, review this article: Crosswind landing Techniques - Calculations, or read the cheat sheet below.         

LEFT:  Wind calculation cheat sheet (click to enlarge).

Important Varibles - Aircraft Weight

To obtain the most accurate Vref for landing, the weight of the aircraft must be known minus the fuel that has been consumed during the flight.

Fortunately, the Flight Management System updates this information in real-time and provides access to the information in the CDU.  It's important that if an approach is lengthy (time consuming) and/or involves holds, the Vref data shown will not be up-to-date (assuming you calculated this at time of descent); the FLAPS/Vref display will show a different speed to that displayed in the FLAP/SPD display.  To update this data, double press the key adjacent to the flaps/speed required and the information will update to the new speed.

Interestingly, the difference that fuel burn and aircraft weight can play in the final Vref speed is quite substantial (assuming all variables, except fuel, are equal).  To demonstrate:

  • Aircraft weight at 74.5 tonnes with fuel tanks 100% full – flaps/Vref 30/158.
  • Aircraft weight at 60.0 tonnes with fuel tanks 25% full   – flaps/Vref 30/142.

 Important Points:

  • During the approach, V speeds are important to maintain.  A commanded speed that is below optimal can be dangerous, especially if the crew needs to conduct a go-around, or if winds suddenly increase or decrease.  An increase or decrease in wind can cause pitch coupling.
  • If executing an RNAV Approach, it's important to update the WIND CORR field to the correct headwind speed based on conditions.  This is because VNAV uses the data from the Flight Management System (FMS).
  • If an approach is lengthy, the Vref speed will need to be updated to take into account the fuel used in the aircraft.  


Autolands are rarely done in the Boeing 737, however, if executing an autoland, the WIND CORR field is left as +5 knots (default).  The autoland and autothrottle logic will command the correct approach and landing speed.


WIND CORR may or may not be functional in the avionics software you use.  It is 100% functional in the ProSim-AR 737 avionics suite (Version 2).


CDU – Control Display Unit
FMC – Flight Management Computer
FMS – Flight Management System (comprising the FMC and CDU)
Vref - The final approach speed is based on the reference landing speed
Vapp – Vapp is your approach speed, and is adjusted for any wind component you might have. You drop from Vapp to Vref usually by just going idle at a certain point in the flare