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Mission Statement 

The purpose of FLAPS-2-APPROACH is two-fold:  To document the construction of a Boeing 737 flight simulator, and to act as a platform to share aviation-related articles pertaining to the Boeing 737; thereby, providing a source of inspiration and reference to like-minded individuals.

I am not a professional journalist.  Writing for a cross section of readers from differing cultures and languages with varying degrees of technical ability, can at times be challenging. I hope there are not too many spelling and grammatical mistakes.

 

Note:   I have NO affiliation with ANY manufacturer or reseller.  All reviews and content are 'frank and fearless' - I tell it as I see it.  Do not complain if you do not like what you read.

I use the words 'modules & panels' and 'CDU & FMC' interchangeably.  The definition of the acronym 'OEM' is Original Equipment Manufacturer (aka real aicraft part).

 

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Journal Archive (Newest First)
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Friday
Jan112013

Replacement Sidewalls for FDS MIP

I have mentioned in my earlier post discussing the Main Instrument Panel (MIP) from Flight Deck Solutions, that the unit was a little wobbly due to the thin metal used on the side-walls.  Whilst this is not a huge problem and certainly not an issue when the MIP is "locked" into a shell, it does pose a minor issue when used without a shell.   Therefore, I decided to fabricate some replacement side stands for the MIP from 3mm aluminium sheet.

AutoCad was used to copy the dimensions of the original FDS sidewalls, and a lazer cutter cut the aluminium sheeting to the exact measurement.  Using a standard pipe bender, I bent the sides out at 45 degrees to allow slightly larger spacing for the rudder pedals.  I also increased the surface area of the metal which is used to attach the MIP to the platform, this ensures a more stable and secure attachment point for the MIP.  To replicate the MIP side-walls exactly, I TIG welded the narrow section that folds behind the stand.

Currently the aluminum is unpainted.  At some stage in the near future I'll either have the two units powder-coated in Boeing grey to match the colour of the MIP, or more than likely I'll prime and paint them myself.

The MIP is now very stable and does not wobble at all.

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